A computer generated graphic of the ICS process. Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) has become the most frequently used technique of fertilization in assisted reproductive technology.

Paternal Lifestyle Effects on ICSI

Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) has become the most frequently used technique of fertilization in assisted reproductive technology. The primary reasons for its acclaim stem from its efficacy, and the standardization of the procedure, which means that it can easily be integrated into the routine practice of fertility centers across the world.  Add to it the fact that it can be used to treat essentially all forms of infertility and is the clear-cut method of choice for overcoming untreatable severe male factor infertility.  In spite of all attempts to increase ICSI efficiency and safety through the utilization of leading sperm retrieval and cryopreservation techniques, as well as methods for selecting sperm with better chromatin integrity, the general pregnancy rates from infertile men remain suboptimal. Treating the root male infertility factor before ICSI seems to be a promising way to enhance ICSI outcomes, but data is still limited.

One particular prospective cohort study aimed at investigating the influence of paternal lifestyle effects on semen parameters and intracytoplasmic sperm injection outcomes. The influence of paternal lifestyle choices on seminal quality and intracytoplasmic sperm injection outcomes was researched in male patients undergoing a conventional semen analysis. Cigarette smoking negatively influenced semen volume, sperm count/ ml, total sperm count, total motile sperm count and SDF. Alcohol consumption negatively influenced sperm count/ml and sperm DNA fragmentation. However, there were no significant findings of other paternal lifestyle factors. Cigarette smoking negatively impacted the fertilization rate and the pace of blastocyst formation. Alcohol consumption negatively influenced fertilization rate and blastocyst formation rate.  The effects of cigarette smoking, as well as alcohol consumption, appear to reduce semen quality, fertilization and blastocyst formation rates.  It would certainly suggest that male partners reconsider their health and lifestyle choices during in vitro reproduction treatment.

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